How stress affects the heart

 

What stresses you out? This question is sure to be answered differently by each person, but it’s an important answer. More importantly, how we handle our stress matters. If we are too stressed out, it spikes our risk of a heart attack or heart disease. On the flip side, if we manage stress well, it lowers the risk. As you read through this article, ask yourself how you rate with each of the techniques.

First and foremost, stress can increase your chances of a heart attack. Heart attacks are associated with pain not only in the chest but all throughout the body. It’s common to have pain the back, arm, jaw and neck. Shortness of breath and headaches are also common. Most experience these symptoms with high levels of anxiety, but a heart attack is serious. Chest pains can be absolutely frightening. If you have a stressful job, you may want to switch careers where your stress is more under control.

Stress also impacts blood sugar levels. Most people think of diabetics when this is mentioned. However, non-diabetics should still be concerned with their blood sugar. When you get angry, your blood sugar rises. When you stay calm, so does your blood sugar. You can tell when it rises because you feel like you’re about to pass out. A person’s face gets red like a cherry, their hands gets red and their voice trembles. Your body turning you red is a warning sign. It’s telling you to calm down. It’s telling you that, should you get any angrier, it’s probably there could be a heart attack.

Digestive problems or obesity could also be a sign of stress. Many people have nausea or vomiting when they are too stressed out. They stray away from their typical eating habits and start eating comfort foods, which may lead to excessive weight gain. They sneak food where nobody will see them eat it, such as closets as if they are ashamed. Diarrhea or constipation may also affect the body. These are also signs that you’re stressed out. When you’re experiencing these symptoms, your body is having to pump more blood. Your heart knows you have anxiety and it’s trying to keep up.

Sleep problems may also be an issue. Many a time I have been kept up thinking. Stress always get the better of me at night, but you have to get sleep in order to stay healthy. Without sleep, it opens the door to insomnia and other problems. It also increases your chances of encountering heart attack, stroke or diabetes. If you lose too much sleep, it could lead to memory problems, a weakened immune system or weight gain. Likewise, it could contribute to high blood pressure or heart disease.

Finally, stress can cause broken heart syndrome. This mimics the symptoms of a heart attack and often occurs when someone is a great deal of physical stress. It may occur after a job loss or the death of a loved one. In contrast to a heart attack, however, the arteries are not blocked due to much fat buildup. Rather, the heart enlarges and does not pump as well. While this is a treatable condition, it can strike an old person or a young and healthy person. The best way to protect your heart is to reduce your stress. Learn how to manage it well and stay ahead of the game.

editor@urbanmediatoday.com

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